• Hollywood International Independant Documentary
  • Northwest Filmmaker Festival
  • Vancouver International film festival
  • Sedona Film Festival
  • Blue Ocean Film Festival
  • Cineme Verde Film Festival
  • Colorado Environmental Film Festival
  • Eugene International Film Festival
  • New Jersey Film Festival
  • Wild & Scenic Film Festival
  • San Luis Obispo Film Festival
  • Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival
  • Transitions Film Festival
  • Water Docs Film Festival
  • San Francisco Green Festival
  • Arizona International Film Festival
  • Canadian International Fashion Film Festival
  • Cleveland International Film Festival
  • Environmental Film Festival in the Nations Capital
  • NYC Indie Film Fest
  • Newport Beach Film Festival
  • Philadelphia Environmental Film Festival
  • Sarasota Film Festival

Victoria Falls, Zambia

Posted on September 4th, 2013

“The Zambezi … this is a river the way a river should be.”

The RiverBlue team spent two weeks in Zimbabwe, Africa. They flew into Victoria Falls and met with Tom Varley, the river guide from Zambezi Eco Tours, and knows the upper Zambezi like the back of his hand. The Zambezi is the fourth-longest river in Africa. Flowing through five African countries and feeding into the Indian Ocean the Zambezi is 2,574 km long.

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The team spent several days on the river; witnessing its natural beauty and the wildlife that can be found around every bend. From hippos and elephants to lions and zebras, the majestic relationship between the Zambezi and the wildlife illustrated that, if left to nature, with minimal impact from man, a river is, in Mark’s words, “a lifeline in the truest sense.”

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Tom took the team to the very lip of Victoria Falls. Mark paddled through the Zambezi, showcasing the beauty of the African rivers. In Mark’s opinion the Zambezi is an example of what a river can and should be and vastly contrasts with other rivers visited throughout the film. The team also met with local river conservationist, Mpisi. This man has stood his ground for the past 40 years against haphazard development and industrial pollution. His efforts have helped to keep the Zambezi one of the last great rivers of the world. Mpisi lives 15 kilometers from the river, close enough to keep a watchful eye on it, and far enough away not to contribute to its pollution.

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